Ako Akonui presented at the Advance HE Conference 2018

Ako Akonui presented at the Advance HE Conference 2018

Ako Aronui News and Updates

The Ako Aronui team are presenting three items, two presentations and a poster, at the Advance HE (formerly HEA) Conference this week in Birmingham. We look forward to seeing you at our presentations or coming by to have a chat at the poster session. For those that are attending our sessions, here are some resources to check out:

If you are at the Conference, come have a kōrero with us:

Ako Aronui: Focusing on caring for our people

Nell Buissink, John Davies, Piki Diamond, Julia Hallas, Jaye McIsaac, Mark Northover, and Emily Whitehead, Auckland University of Technology

In imagining how the HEA Fellowship framework would best suit AUT’s regional and cultural context, underpinning Maori world views have become the core areas of focus. Recognising Aotearoa New Zealand’s bicultural origins, but also supporting our multicultural world, the concept of manaaki (mindful support) emerged as the central value for both students and academics. We describe the process of mapping the UKPSF (the credential central to Fellowship) to a core set of principles or values for the fellowship categories. A pilot programme enabled a refinement of these values, which drive the University’s newly accredited fellowship pathway

2:30pm July 4, Session SP3.11a, Room 231

 

Practice to Strategy: Implementing a locally based framework for teaching recognition and its impact on a university’s strategic direction

Nell Buissink, John Davies, Piki Diamond, Julia Hallas, Jaye McIsaac, Mark Northover, and Emily Whitehead, Auckland University of Technology

AUT is one of a number of recently subscribed HEA / Advance HE institutions in Australasia, and is the first university in Aotearoa New Zealand to introduce a comprehensive framework for teaching recognition. The Ako Aronui Framework is based on indigenous Maori values and the UKPSF. A key consideration was combining the local context alongside institutional needs. In this case study we show how senior managers view the implications of implementing an innovative, bicultural framework. By sharing our experience we hope to make explicit the process for gaining strategic impact from developing a locally based framework in conjunction with HEA / Advance HE.

4:10pm July 4, Session SP4.14a, Room 375

 

Nau Mai, Haere Mai: Welcoming the UKPSF into Auckland University of Technology 

Nell Buissink, John Davies, Piki Diamond, Julia Hallas, Jaye McIsaac, Mark Northover and Emily Whitehead, Auckland University of Technology

The pōwhiri, is a Māori welcoming ritual with an objective to make visitors one with the host. We adopted this ritual for the arrival of the UKPSF into our Aotearoa New Zealand university to establish a free and open negotiation to ensure a culturally relevant and responsive approach. We will illustrate how the pōwhiri protocols mapped the journey which AUT, the UKPSF, and the HEA undertook, from which the inception of Ako Aronui was birthed. Adopting pōwhiri protocols allowed AUT to determine and lead how we would engage with the UKPSF in a way that was mutually beneficial.

Litchfield Lounge (Poster Session on July 4th, 3:40pm)

Ako Aronui Team members attended Inaugural Meeting of Australiasian Accredited Programme Managers Network

Ako Aronui Team members attended Inaugural Meeting of Australiasian Accredited Programme Managers Network

Ako Aronui News and Updates

Dr Nell Buissink SFHEA and Jaye McIsaac SFHEA attended the Inaugural Meeting of the Australiasian Accredited Programme Managers Network, hosted by Western Sydney University. AUT joined with Western Sydney University, Murdoch University, Queensland University of Technology, Massey University, University of Tasmania, Australian National University and University of Sydney for detailed discussion and collaboration around creating and managing accredited programmes with the Higher Education Academy (HEA).

Paper published on placing ‘manaaki’ at the heart of Ako Aronui

Paper published on placing ‘manaaki’ at the heart of Ako Aronui

Ako Aronui News and Updates

The Ako Aronui team has published a paper in the Higher Education Research & Development (HERD) Journal called “Challenging a measured university from an indigenous perspective: placing ‘manaaki’ at the heart of our professional development programme” which reflects on the development of the Ako Aronui Profession Learning Programme. It reflects on the journey of embedding of Māori values and principles in the Uk Professional Standards Framework (UKPSF), in particular manaaki, to contextualise the UKPSF for the unique Aotearoa New Zealand context.

Buissink, N., Diamond, P., Hallas, J., Swann, J., & Sciascia, A. D. (2017). Challenging a measured university from an indigenous perspective: placing ‘manaaki’ at the heart of our professional development programme. Higher Education Research & Development, 36(3), 569–582. https://doi.org/10.1080/07294360.2017.1288706

 


Image provided under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
(CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) license

Ako Aronui: AUT has become an HEA Strategic Partner

Ako Aronui News and Updates

Auckland University of Technology (AUT), and in particular the Ako Aronui team within the Centre for Learning and Teaching, are working towards HEA accreditation of the Ako Aronui Professional Learning Programme, aiming to complete their submission by 31 October. As part of this AUT has become an HEA Strategic Partner and has made an made an institutional commitment to provide an accredited Professional Learning Programme (PLP) through the Higher Education Academy (HEA) for all staff who teach and support student learning. This makes AUT the second University in New Zealand to subscribe to the HEA.

HEA International has written an article about AUT’s subscription here.

Along with subscribing to the HEA, AUT has become a member of the Australasian Strategic Advisory Board, read more about the newly created board in an HEA article on its first meeting.